Friday, August 1

Alopecia areata barbae causes - Alopecia barbae treatments

Alopecia areata barbae causes - Treatments for alopecia areata barbae.
What is alopecia areata barbae?
Alopecia areata barbae is hair loss as patches in the beard area.
Alopecia areata barbae is a non contagious condition affecting a very small percentage of men. It has no specific cause and there is no standard treatment. It is considered to be an autoimmune disorder. The immune mechanism mistakenly identifies the hair follicle as an antigen and attacks it. This autoimmune activity leads to inflammation of the hair follicles and the detachment of the affected hair. Hereditary predisposition is also a major contributing factor for developing Alopecia areata barbae.

Those men suffering from spotted hair loss on the scalp may or may not develop A. areata barbae. The disorder can also affect apparently perfectly healthy men having no problem on the scalp. In some cases the disorder may resolve by itself and disappear. In some men AA. barbae may recur. The affected area may remain as a patch or progress to cover the entire beard. In rare cases there may be involvement of nails like pitting, thinning or detachment from the nail bed. In rare cases burning, itching or tingling sensation is experienced in the affected skin.

Causes of alopecia areata barbae

Though it known that autoimmune reactions are the cause of hair loss, it is not still clearly understood why the hair loss appears as patches on the scalp and/or beard area and why particularly certain areas are only being targeted.
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It also not clear why perifollicular accumulation of antigen-presenting cells occurs at the site of AA. barbae. Hormonal imbalances, extreme mental or physical stress, environmental stress, allergic reactions, chemicals and presence of autoimmune diseases may contribute or trigger AA. barbae disorder.

Diagnosis and differential diagnosis

Differential diagnosis has to be done to rule out certain conditions wherein hair loss occurs in the beard area. Infection or inflammation of the follicles as in tinea barbae and folliculitis barbae may sometimes cause temporary or permanent damage to hair follicles and the affected area may appear as hairless patch after resolution of the condition.
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Pseudofolliculitis barbae (shave bumps) affected skin may also show patches of hair loss in the affected area after the resolution. In such conditions the observed hair loss on the beard area is not alopecia areata barbae.

Treatment options

Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent aggravation and mental stress. Shaving daily is the immediate treatment. Immunosuppression of cytokines responsible for the inflammatory reactions is the best treatment option. Immunosuppression causes inhibitory effect on the autoimmunity at the site of AA. barbae.
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Intralesional corticosteroid injections or topical corticosteroids shows good results but prolonged use can lead to thickening or thinning of the skin. Minoxidil, an antihypertensive vasodilator medication is found to promote regrowth of hair. Anthralin, a synthetic anti-psoriatic medication controls progress of alopecia areata barbae and promotes hair growth.
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